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Blue Box Recycling

Contacts

The Township provides one free blue box for each newly constructed dwelling; subsequent boxes are $6.00 each. Taped or tied corrugated cardboard and styrofoam blocks are collected with cans and plastic food and beverage containers; bagged and tied plastic bags are collected with paper products and glass. Recyclable items alternate weekly - Yellow Week is the collection of paper and glass and Blue Week is the collection of cans & plastic. PLEASE DO NOT BAG YOUR CANS AND PLASTICS!

 Please see our Recycle Calendar below for the appropriate weeks to put out your items to be recycled. if you are new to the area, please call the Public Works office (613 376-3900 X 4330) to find out what day of the week your collection is.

 

2017-2018 Recycle Calendar

The Township is attempting a more environmentally
sustainable approach, rather than direct mail, in distributing the next 2 year
Recycling Calendar. The Frontenac News will be delivering the 2017-2019 Recycle
Calendar, as an insert, in its August 24th edition which will include Storrington
area residents.

 

If you find yourself will excess recycling, South Frontenac residents are welcome to take it to Kingston Area Recycling at no charge. This facility is at 196 Lappans Lane just off of John Counter Boulevard and is open Monday - Friday 8 am to 5 pm and proof of residency should be available.

Where can I get a Blue Box?

14 gallon Blue Recycle boxes are available at the Keeley Road Public Works office located at 2490 Keeley Road during office hours for $6.00 each.

Who should pay for recycling?

Municipal taxpayers? Producers of paper and packaging?

Currently Municipal taxpayers pay 50% or more of Blue Box costs. Legislation has been passed and is currently awaiting Royal Assent on the New Waste Free Ontario Act. This act would see an extended responsibility put on the producer to reduce waste in their packaging and end of life products. Click on the link above to read more on the Act.

Removal of Coloured Styrofoam from the Blue Box Program

Due to the low market value and limited markets of Styrofoam, as of May 9th, 2016 the City of Kingston is no longer accepting colored Styrofoam from our Blue Boxes. The majority, if not all of the colored Styrofoam, consists of colored meat trays which are used only for esthetic purposes in marketing.  White meat trays and other Styrofoam packaging will continue to be accepted in the blue box program. Any colored Styrofoam must be disposed of in your garbage after this date.

Why can't I bag my recycling?

As we take our recycling to the City of Kingston, we must abide by their rules and bagged recycling is not allowed as it is dumped by material type in different areas of the floor. As well of the constant problems of non-recyclables being tossed in by mistake is the age old problem of what to do with the bag if the workers took the time to empty the bags. These end up flying across the Township and become someone elses headache not to mention the unsightly mess and danger to our environment. So if your bagged recyclables are left behind, please put them in a blue box. The workers then have a quick visual of what is in your recycle box is what should be in there.

For more information about recycling, please contact the Facilities & Solid Waste Department at (613) 376-3027 Ext 4330.

It's always a guessing game as to whether or not a houshold item is destined for our Blue Box program or garbage.  Hopefully the following will be helpful:

Bag it - Bundle it!

The Plastic Recycling Symbols

Plastic #1 - PETE or PET (Polyethylene Terephthalate)

Picked up by most curbside recycling programs, plastic #1 is usually clear and used to make soda and water bottles. Some consider it safe, but this plastic is known to allow bacteria to accumulate.

It's found mostly in soda bottles, water bottles, salad dressing containers, mouthwash bottles, and peanut butter containers.

Plastic #1 is recycled into tote bags, furniture, carpet, paneling, fiber, and polar fleece.

Plastic #2 - HDPE (High Density Polyethylene)

Plastic #2 is typically opaque and picked up by most curbside recycling programs. This plastic is one of the 3 plastics considered to be safe, and has a lower risk of leaching.

It's found mostly in milk jugs, juice bottles, shampoo bottles, cereal box liners, detergent bottles, yogurt tubs, and butter tubs, milk jugs, detergent bottles, juice bottles, butter tubs, and toiletries bottles are made of this. It is usually opaque. This plastic is considered safe and has low risk of leaching.

Plastic #2 is recycled into pens, recycling containers, picnic tables, lumber, benches, fencing, and detergent bottles, to name a few.

** The #2 can be found on motor oil bottles and some household cleaners. These items should NOT be put out in regular recycling as they are considered hazardous waste. Please bring them to our free HHW Depot at 2491 Keeley Road when open.

Plastic #3 - V or PVC (Vinyl)

Plastic #3 is used to make food wrap, plumbing pipes, and detergent bottles, and is seldom accepted by curbside recycling programs. These plastics used to, and still may, contain phthalates, which are linked to numerous health issues ranging from developmental problems to miscarriages. They also contain DEHA, which can be carcinogenic with long-term exposure. DEHA has also been linked to loss of bone mass and liver problems. Don't cook with or burn this plastic.

It's found in shampoo bottles, clear food packaging, cooking oil bottles, medical equipment, piping, and windows.

This plastic is recycled into paneling, flooring, speed bumps, decks, and roadway gutters.

Plastic #4 - LDPE (Low Density Polyethylene)

Low density polyethylene is most found in squeezable bottles, shopping bags, clothing, carpet, frozen food, bread bags, and some food wraps. Curbside recycling programs haven't been known to pick up this plastic, but more are starting to accept it. Plastic #4 rests among the recycling symbols considered to be safe.

 This plastic is recycled into compost bins, paneling, trash can liners and cans, floor tiles, and shipping envelopes.

Plastic #5 - PP (Polypropylene)

Increasingly becoming accepted by curbside recycle programs, plastic #5 is also one of the safer plastics to look for.

It is typically found in yogurt containers, ketchup bottles, syrup bottles, and medicine bottles.

Polypropylene is recycled into brooms, auto battery cases, bins, pallets, signal lights, ice scrapers, and bicycle racks.

Plastic #6 - PS (Polystyrene)

Polystyrene is Styrofoam, which is notorious for being difficult to recycle, and thus, bad for the environment. This kind of plastic also poses a health risk, leaching potentially toxic chemicals, especially when heated. Most recycling programs won't accept it.

Plastic #6 is found in compact disc cases, egg cartons, meat trays, and disposable plates and cups.

It is recycled into egg cartons, vents, foam packing, and insulation.

** Colored styrofoam is no longer accepted in our Recycling Program, only the white trays. Any packaging Styrofoam must be tied/taped into bundles no larger than 2' X 3' X 8' and placed out with your cans & plastics weeks.

 

Plastic #7 - Other, Miscellaneous MOSTLY NOT ACCEPTED IN THE BLUE BOX RESIDENTIAL PROGRAM

All of the plastic resins that don't fit into the other categories are placed in the number 7 category. It's a mix bag of plastics that includes polycarbonate, which contains the toxic bisphenol-A (BPA). These plastics should be avoided due to possibly containing hormone disruptors like BPA, which has been linked to infertility, hyperactivity, reproductive problems, and other health issues.

Plastic #7 is found in sunglasses, iPod cases, computer cases, nylon 3- and 5-gallon water bottles, childrens hard plastic toys and  bullet-proof materials.

It is recycled into plastic lumber and other custom-made products.